Saturday, March 24, 2012

IBS, CFS and Pregnancy

Note:  The writer states, "IBS is linked with chronic fatigue syndrome
and fibromyalgia, which causes widespread pain, and researchers said
these conditions should also be studied to see if they caused
miscarriage." There have been studies on pregnancy in fibromyalgia and
CFS.

A 2011 study of women able to give birth who had fibromyalgia vs
pregnant controls who did not yielded the following stats: Parturients
with FMS had higher rates of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR;
7.1% vs. 1.0%, p = 0.001), recurrent abortions defined as 3 or more
spontaneous miscarriages (9.8% vs. 1.8%, p < 0.001), gestational
diabetes mellitus (14.3% vs. 7%, p = 0.012), and polyhydramnios (12.5%
vs. 1.6%, p < 0.001). These patients had lower rates of preterm
deliveries (PTD; 6.3% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.018).

Schacterle and Komaroff (2004) found that the rate of first trimester
spontaneous miscarriage was 4 times higher than normal in women with
CFS.
The authors acknowledge that this higher rate may be caused by
confounding variables and that further investigation is needed to
validate this finding. The authors found no significant difference in
the rate of other pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia,
gestational diabetes, preterm labor, or low birth weight infants, in
women who became pregnant after the onset of CFS.

Dr. Jonathan Kerr associated Parvovirus B19 with subgroups of CFS.
Parvovirus B19 can cause hydrops fetalis if a non-immune pregnant
woman is exposed, but the CDC states that less than 5% of women who
get parvovirus B19 during pregnancy end up miscarrying. A clinical
history of antibodies to Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) is associated
with miscarriage as is CFS, but that doesn't necessarily equate to
more miscarriages in CFS patients with an intial infection of Q fever.

Bowel condition may increase the risk of miscarriage

By JO MACFARLANE/ Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 19:10 EST, 24 March 2012 | UPDATED: 19:10 EST, 24 March 2012


Pregnant women with a common bowel condition may be 20 per cent more
likely to miscarry, according to new research.

The study is the first to look at the links between irritable bowel
syndrome (IBS) and miscarriage and suggests that pregnant women with
the condition should receive additional antenatal (prenatal) care.

The research examined information from the GP records of 100,000
British women who became pregnant between January 1990 and December
2008. Of those, more than 26,000 had suffered from IBS, a chronic
condition causing pain and bloating.

Pregnant women with a bowel condition may be 20 per cent more likely
to miscarry, according to new research

The researchers found that 6,500 – six per cent – of the women
suffered a miscarriage, which is within the normal range.

But when they looked at the women who also had IBS, the proportion who
lost their babies rose to 7.5 per cent, which is considered
significant.

The risk increased further – up to 30 per cent – if the women also had
pre-existing problems with depression and anxiety. IBS is linked with
chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, which causes widespread
pain, and researchers said these conditions should also be studied to
see if they caused miscarriage.

The study was by a team from University College Cork in Ireland and
the University of Manchester. One of the authors, Dr Ali Khashan, from
the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at University College
Cork, said: 'We think this will open the eyes of clinicians and GPs to
the possibility women who have IBS should be cared for in a certain
way if pregnant.'

IBS is a common condition of the digestive system causing painful
bouts of stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation. While
there is no cure, the symptoms can be relieved by altering diet and
managed by medication.

However, obstetrician Virginia Beckett, of the Royal College of
Obstetrics and Gynaecology, urged caution over the findings. 'IBS is
often misdiagnosed and there can be other underlying problems which
may contribute to miscarriage,' she said. 'Women should ensure they
take folic acid throughout pregnancy as it reduces the risk of
miscarriage. They should also stop smoking, lose weight and eat
healthily.'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2119880/Bowel-condition-increase-risk-miscarriage.html#ixzz1q5dHhzxJ

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