Sunday, April 17, 2011

More on proteins in CSF in CFS patients

Note: This article expands on the spinal fluid abnormality stories
saying, "Because some of the proteins found in the spinal fluid of
chronic fatigue syndrome patients also are implicated in Alzheimer's
and Parkinson's diseases, the results support the idea that chronic
fatigue syndrome has an underlying neurological cause."

tricityherald.com / Business

PNNL scientist leads research into chronic fatigue syndrome treatment

From Herald news services

RICHLAND -- High-tech protein analysis done in Richland could lead to
improvements in diagnosis and treatment of the little-understood
chronic fatigue syndrome.

The analysis done at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory
on the campus of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory identified a
subset of proteins in the spinal fluid of patients with chronic
fatigue syndrome that are not present in healthy patients.

The discovery also calls into question the belief of some scientists
that chronic fatigue syndrome, with its debilitating fatigue, is an
umbrella category that includes other diseases, including Lyme
disease, that lingers after treatment.

Research was conducted by a team at the University of Medicine and
Dentistry of New Jersey's medical school and a team led by Richard
Smith at PNNL.

It relied on special protein separation techniques and high-powered
mass spectrometry equipment at the Department of Energy's
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

Investigators looked at the spinal fluid of 43 people who had been
diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, 25 patients who had failed to
completely recover from Lyme disease and 11 healthy people.

"Spinal fluid is like a liquid window to the brain," said Dr. Steven
Schutzer of the New Jersey Medical School, in a statement.

Researchers found some of the same proteins in chronic fatigue
syndrome and neurologic post treatment Lyme disease patients. But
patients also had proteins unique to each condition, despite their
similar symptoms.

Because some of the proteins found in the spinal fluid of chronic fatigue syndrome patients also are implicated in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, the results support the idea that chronic fatigue syndrome has an underlying neurological cause.

"These exciting findings are the tip of our research iceberg," Smith
said in a statement. Newer techniques are being developed to allow
researchers to learn more about chronic fatigue syndrome, lingering
Lyme disease and other neurological diseases, he said.

Read more: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2011/03/11/1403487/pnnl-scientist-leads-research.html#ixzz1GK0isgm3

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