Friday, October 29, 2010

The role of changes in activity as a function of perceived available energy

The role of changes in activity as a function of perceived available
and expended energy in nonpharmacological treatment outcomes for ME/CFS.

Authors: Brown, M., Khorana, N and Jason LA.

Joiurnal: Journal of Clinical Psychology,  2010.  Online 25th
October. doi: 10.1002/jclp.20744


Nonpharmacological interventions for myalgic
encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) often emphasize
gradual increases in activity to promote improvement in physical
functioning and fatigue.

The energy envelope theory may provide a framework for understanding
the relationship between changes in activity level and outcomes for
patients with ME/CFS.

This study examined the relationship between energy envelope and
changes in activity after nonpharmacological interventions in a
sample of 44 adults with ME/CFS.

Results showed that those who were within their energy envelope
before treatment showed more improvement in physical functioning and
fatigue compared with those outside of their energy envelope.

These findings suggest that an assessment of perceived available and
expended energy could help guide the development of individualized
nonpharmacological interventions for people with ME/CFS.
* * *
What some people find difficult to comprehend is that for some patients, the "energy envelope" is extremely small.  At my sickest, even just getting to the kitchen 3x a day to fix simple meals was too much; it wasn't till I switched two meals a day to cereal bars and nutrition shakes kept next to the bed that I stopped driving myself into energy bankruptcy every single day.
 
 

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