Monday, September 6, 2010

3 articles on Post Exertional Malaise

[The latter two in particular have a lot of references from research
studies. Tom]

1)      Unraveling Post-exertional Malaise

By Jennifer M. Spotila, J.D.

"A 2009 survey of more than 1,000 patients conducted by the CFIDS
Association of America found that post-exertional malaise (PEM)1 is one
of the most common and most severe symptoms reported by individuals with
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)2. This article, the first in a series,
examines the definition of PEM and how CFS patients experience it. PEM
is also referred to as post-exertional relapse and post-exertional
fatigue."

http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/060204.asp
<http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/060204.asp>



2)      Post-Exertional Malaise: Perception and Reality

By Jennifer M. Spotila, J.D.

"Dr. Anthony Komaroff of Harvard University recently described
post-exertional malaise (PEM) as "an illness within an illness."
This article, the second in a series, examines objective evidence of PEM
and how it differs from fatigue in other illnesses."

http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/080402.asp
<http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/080402.asp>

3)       Post-Exertional Malaise: Cause and Effect

By Jennifer M. Spotila, J.D.

"Post-exertional malaise (PEM) is one symptom of chronic fatigue
syndrome (CFS), but is itself more complex than a single symptom.
Patients experience fatigue, pain, cognitive difficulties, sore throat,
and/or swollen lymph nodes after previously tolerated physical or mental
activity. These symptoms may appear immediately after the activity or
after a period of delay, and may last days or weeks. This article, the
third in a series, examines what mechanisms may cause PEM."

http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/080403.asp
<http://www.cfids.org/cfidslink/2010/080403.asp>

No comments: